A History of Mining in Latin America : From the Colonial Era by Kendall W. Brown PDF

By Kendall W. Brown

ISBN-10: 0826351077

ISBN-13: 9780826351074

For twenty-five years, Kendall Brown studied Potosí, Spanish America's maximum silver manufacturer and maybe the world's most renowned mining district. He examine the flood of silver that flowed from its Cerro Rico and discovered of the toil of its miners. Potosí symbolized very good wealth and incredible ache. New international bullion motivated the formation of the 1st global financial system yet while it had profound outcomes for hard work, as mine operators and refiners resorted to severe different types of coercion to safe staff. In
many circumstances the surroundings additionally suffered devastating harm.
All of this happened within the identify of wealth for person marketers, businesses, and the ruling states. but the query continues to be of the way a lot monetary improvement mining controlled to supply in Latin the US and what have been its social and ecological results. Brown's specialise in the mythical mines at Potosí and comparability of its operations to these of alternative mines in Latin the United States is a well-written and obtainable research that's the first to span the colonial period to the present.
Part of the Diálogos sequence of Latin American experiences

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Extra info for A History of Mining in Latin America : From the Colonial Era to the Present

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He contracted with some of the former claimholders to continue operations and stipulated the amount of mercury they were to produce and the price the government would pay for it. Under his system, the Huancavelica treasury office bought the mercury and shipped it to Potosí and the other silver mines for sale. The switch to amalgamation meant an increased demand for labor to extract and refine massive quantities of ore. Viceroy Toledo committed the colonial government to providing the mines and mills with workers.

Despite Cabrera’s protests and lawsuits, Toledo prevailed. He contracted with some of the former claimholders to continue operations and stipulated the amount of mercury they were to produce and the price the government would pay for it. Under his system, the Huancavelica treasury office bought the mercury and shipped it to Potosí and the other silver mines for sale. The switch to amalgamation meant an increased demand for labor to extract and refine massive quantities of ore. Viceroy Toledo committed the colonial government to providing the mines and mills with workers.

At Potosí, which had a mint, a refiner could easily exchange his piña silver for coin. Sometimes officials simply smelted the silver into an ingot and stamped it with royal seals and identification numbers. However, most mining districts had no mint, and scarcity of coin was often a great hindrance, especially when the payment of small amounts, such as for workers’ wages and the purchase of food and other necessities, was called for. The government’s financial stake in silver production at Potosí and other mining districts was substantial.

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A History of Mining in Latin America : From the Colonial Era to the Present by Kendall W. Brown


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